labor

Thu
23
Feb

Tens of Thousands Strike on Day without Immigrants

February 23, 2017
Dan DiMaggio, Sonia Singh
Labor Notes

Arkansas poultry workers, Brooklyn warehouse workers and house cleaners, Twin Cities roofers, and thousands of students in places like Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Charlotte, North Carolina. They were all among the tens of thousands who stayed home from work or school across the country during Thursday, February 16’s “Day without Immigrants.”

The action, largely spread over social media and informal networks in working-class immigrant communities, was a response to President Donald Trump’s promise to dramatically expand immigration enforcement and the wave of raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement the prior week.

“They’re calling us criminals and rapists,” said Jose Flemate, a member of Roofers Local 96 in St. Paul, Minnesota, who struck with his co-workers. “We’re not like that—we came to America looking for a better life, and we worked hard and built America.

Tue
20
Dec

Why Capitalism Creates Pointless Jobs

By David Graeber

In the year 1930, John Maynard Keynes predicted that technology would have advanced sufficiently by century’s end that countries like Great Britain or the United States would achieve a 15-hour work week. There’s every reason to believe he was right. In technological terms, we are quite capable of this. And yet it didn’t happen. Instead, technology has been marshaled, if anything, to figure out ways to make us all work more. In order to achieve this, jobs have had to be created that are, effectively, pointless. Huge swathes of people, in Europe and North America in particular, spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed. The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it.

Sun
18
Dec

The Power of Deep Organizing

by Sam Gindin
Jacobin magazine
December 8, 2016

The profound defeat of the US labor movement over the past three to four decades is usually measured by the loss of things that workers once took for granted like decent wages and benefits. A less quantifiable but ultimately more decisive indicator is the retreat from possibilities. By extension, the labor movement’s renewal (or reinvention) is inseparable from reversing, through effective struggle, this lowering of expectations. Jane McAlevey captured this sentiment in the title of her first book, Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell), a memoir based on her experiences as a labor organizer.

Sun
09
Oct

War on the docks! Chilean port struggles tour

From Black Rose Anarchist Federation

Join us in a speaking tour on the struggles and lessons of the Chilean port workers with Nelson Francino Valdes, an anarchist, dockworker, and president of the Federation of Portworkers of Iquique! Nelson has been involved in several of the most important struggles and strikes in Chile in recent years, including a month long national strike in 2014. He is in the US as Chile’s delegate to the International Dockworkers Council general assembly in Miami and is participating in a short national speaking tour organized by the Industrial Workers of the World and the Black Rose Anarchist Federation.

Tue
13
Sep

Here's What's Gone Down So Far in Three Days of America's Largest Prison Strikes

Jeremy Galloway
The Influence
September 12th, 2016

This is how struggle starts … I’m very, very encouraged … Keep going … I don’t think it can be stopped.”
—Lorenzo Komboa Ervin, co-founder of Black Autonomy Federation and original Black Panther Party member.

Summer is drawing to an end here in the South, but in the region’s prisons—and across the most incarcerated nation on earth—things are just starting to heat up.

Friday (September 9), marked the 45th anniversary of the Attica Prison Uprising. It also saw the launch of a coordinated series of nationwide work stoppages and hunger strikes by incarcerated Americans, the largest of its kind in history.

Tue
13
Sep

Rebellion and Reprisals: How outside support can impact the outcome of prison struggles

On September 9, prisoners in more than seventeen US states are planning a nationally coordinated work stoppage and protest, according to the Incarcerated Workers' Organizing Committee of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWOC). IWOC also counts 35 states where numerous captives are aware of the strike and the growing mobilization of outside support. On the date of this writing, that outside support involves events or actions in over fifty cities across the country.

Fri
26
Aug

The Wages for Housework Campaign and ‘Women’s Work’ Under Capitalism

By Rebecca Winter and Jasmina Brankovich
Australia

“Why has woman’s work never been of any account? […] Because those who want to emancipate mankind [sic] have not included woman in their dream of emancipation, and consider it beneath their superior masculine dignity to think “of those kitchen arrangements,” which they have rayed on the shoulders of that drudge-woman.[…]Let us fully understand that a revolution, intoxicated with the beautiful words Liberty, Equality, Solidarity would not be a revolution if it maintained slavery at home. Half of humanity subjected to the slavery of the hearth would still have to rebel against the other half” – Peter Kropotkin (1).

Sat
30
Jul

Focus on Fight for 15

The Fight for 15 is a growing movement in the United States which seeks to increase wages for service workers.

From Wikipedia:

"The, Fight for $15 an hour, involves child care, home healthcare, airport, gas station, convenience store, and fast food workers striking for increased pay and the right to form a union with their employers."

 

 

 

Latest News

August 19, 2016

Fri
15
Jan

 This Is What $15 an Hour Looks Like



On a crisp November morning in Oakland, 50 people dressed in red T-shirts burst into a McDonald’s, bringing breakfast orders to a halt. From behind the counter, several cashiers gaped at the scene, where an orderly line of customers had been replaced by a rowdy crew that bounced and shouted, calling for the restaurant to raise its wages to $15 an hour. A supervisor whipped out her cell phone and began filming. The chant, directed at the workers, grew louder: “Come on out—we’ve got your back!” After giving it some thought, three female employees walked past their supervisor, clocked out, and joined the protesters. The crowd erupted in cheers.

Thu
31
Dec

Recuperating Work and Life

by Marina Sitrin
ROAR Magazine

As the economic crisis deepens and governments—instead of providing support—respond with more austerity, people throughout the world are not only resisting but increasingly creating their own solutions in multiple spheres of life. Work is an especially difficult area around which to organize if the government refuses to aid the unemployed or underemployed, and yet it is also one where some of the most innovative solutions are arising.

One alternative to the prospect of never-ending unemployment is the recuperation of workplaces. No longer making demands on governments that have turned their backs on the population, people are turning to one another. Workers are taking over abandoned workplaces and making them function again, getting rid of bosses and hierarchy while developing democratic assemblies, equal pay remuneration, job rotation and more ecological production practices.

Feelings of power and dignity

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