capitalism

Thu
27
Apr

The United States of Work

By Miya Tokumitsu
The New Republic
April 18, 2017

Work no longer works. “You need to acquire more skills,” we tell young job seekers whose résumés at 22 are already longer than their parents’ were at 32. “Work will give you meaning,” we encourage people to tell themselves, so that they put in 60 hours or more per week on the job, removing them from other sources of meaning, such as daydreaming or social life. “Work will give you satisfaction,” we insist, even though it requires abiding by employers’ rules, and the unwritten rules of the market, for most of our waking hours. At the very least, work is supposed to be a means to earning an income. But if it’s possible to work full time and still live in poverty, what’s the point?

Mon
03
Apr

As Trump's Denialists Get to Work, the Climate Is Changing 170 Times Faster

By Dahr Jamail
Truthout
March 27, 2017

You can feel it, can't you?

You already know what is happening to the planet. To Gaia. To Earth. To the only planet humankind will ever "permanently" inhabit. We've nowhere else to go but here ... this incredible, majestic, beautiful Garden of Eden that has held us, and carried us, this far.

We have ignored the fact that we are, at best, mere stewards. We have forsaken the Earth by fantasizing that the planet was ours to control. To exploit. To manipulate. To drill, mine and desecrate. To gain riches from.

The balance is upset, the die is cast, now we reap the consequences of a whirlwind of forces so vast we cannot comprehend them.

We needn't look far to see how very far off the climate precipice we have already fallen, as our pace accelerates by the day.

Mon
27
Mar

The Western idea of private property is flawed. Indigenous peoples have it right

Julian Brave NoiseCat
March 27, 2017

We live in a world dominated by the principle of private property. Once indigenous people were dispossessed of their lands, the land was surveyed, subdivided and sold to the highest bidder. From high above, continents now appear as an endless property patchwork of green and yellow farms, beige suburban homes and metallic gray city blocks stretching from sea to shining sea.

Sat
31
Dec

Where the revolution is more likely to happen, in developed or non-developing countries?

by Zaher Baher
November 2016
Anarkismo.net

There is no doubt that over the last couple of decades our movement has declined dramatically . Not only it is not achievable anymore, in fact it cannot maintain what had already achieved before. It is also very clear that Marx's theory is not the remedy for the current situation any longer. I believe it is extremely hard to expect that the revolution to take place in the advanced industrialised countries, at least not in the very near future.

This article puts forward the argument of possibility that the revolution could happen in the less or non-industrialised countries, before the advanced industrialised countries.

The article explains the mechanisms that exist in the non-industrialised countries that brings about the revolution.

Where the revolution is more likely to happen, in developed or non-developing countries?

Fri
21
Oct

AirBNB Ain't The Class War Liberals Want You To Think It Is

Special to Infoshop News
October 21, 2016

Tue
27
Sep

Your consumer choices won't save the planet

by Kieran
Anarchist Affinity (Australia)

The climate catastrophe is capitalism.

Surely if we were all more committed to buying green, fair trade, or ethically produced products, there would be less environmental and economic exploitation in the world, right?

The idea that our consumer choices are ‘votes' for the kind of world we want to live in is a powerful one, but it is an idea that is gravely mistaken.

Our current economic system, capitalism, is eating away at the ecological basis of our existence, whilst exploiting and dominating the lives of billions of people. This destruction, domination and exploitation is driven not by consumer choices, but by the logic of capital accumulation.

Fri
02
Sep

No, Capitalism Isn’t Making Us All Richer and Richer

by Kevin Carson
September 2, 2016
Center for a Stateless Society

Mon
08
Aug

Hunger in Venezuela? A Look Beyond the Spin

by Christina Schiavoni and William Camacaro
Food First
7.11.2016

You may have seen the headlines about Venezuela – headlines that allude to food scarcity, rioting, people eating stray animals to survive, and a country on the brink of starvation. These stories are not only alarming, but perplexing, too. Is this the same country that was recognized by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) as recently as 2015 for having nearly eradicated hunger?[i] Is this the same country that has been the focus of international delegations and extensive alternative media coverage for its ‘food sovereignty experiment’ involving agrarian reform, food distributions programs, and direct citizen participation in the food system?[ii] What’s going on?

Sat
30
Jul

Working-Class Militancy in the Global South

by Immanuel Ness/ROAR Magazine

A profound movement is emerging among workers in developing countries, demanding radical action on grievances outside the system of established unions.

In the 1980s, the economies that had dominated the world in the postwar era entered a period of far-reaching transition away from state participation to private sector dominance. The conversion process was not uniform: in some cases the shift to market control occurred gradually through the withdrawal of state subsidies for social welfare, and in other instances a radical shift away from public welfare was imposed all at once, in what came to be known as shock therapy.

Sun
17
Jul

Clean energy won’t save us – only a new economic system can do that

by Jason Hickel

Earlier this year media outlets around the world announced that February had broken global temperature records by a shocking amount. March broke all the records, too. In June our screens were covered with surreal images of Paris flooding, the Seine bursting its banks and flowing into the streets. In London, the floods sent water pouring into the tube system right in the heart of Covent Garden. Roads in south-east London became rivers two metres deep.

With such extreme events becoming more commonplace, few deny climate change any longer. Finally, a consensus is crystallising around one all-important fact: fossil fuels are killing us. We need to switch to clean energy, and fast.

This growing awareness about the dangers of fossil fuels represents a crucial shift in our consciousness. But I can’t help but fear we’ve missed the point. As important as clean energy might be, the science is clear: it won’t save us from climate change.

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