anarchism

Sun
15
May

Anarchist Organisation – Practice as Theory Actualised

by Anarcho
Anarchist Writers
5/05/2016

“organisation, that is to say, association for a specific purpose and with the structure and means required to attain it, is a necessary aspect of social life. A man in isolation cannot even live the life of a beast... Having therefore to join with other humans... he must submit to the will of others (be enslaved) or subject others to his will (be in authority) or live with others in fraternal agreement in the interests of the greatest good of all (be an associate). Nobody can escape from this necessity.” – Errico Malatesta[1]

Sun
15
May

Revolution Is More Than a Word: 23 Theses on Anarchism

Gabriel Kuhn
PM Press

This text originally appeared on Alpine Anarchist Productions, a project I've been involved with for the past 15 years.

Intro

Since the turn of the millennium, anarchism has experienced a strong upswing. In a widely read 2004 article by David Graeber and Andrej Grubačić, it was announced as the “revolutionary movement of the twenty-first century”, and in a recent book on the Occupy Wall Street movement, titled Translating Anarchy and based on interviews with numerous organizers, author Mark Bray contests that anarchist ideas were the driving ideological force behind it. Meanwhile, anarchist projects (journals, bookfairs, organizing groups) have increased significantly over the past twenty years. This is all great news.

Sun
15
May

Noam Chomsky: Masters of Mankind

This piece is excerpted from Noam Chomsky’s new book, Who Rules the World? (Metropolitan Books).

When we ask “Who rules the world?” we commonly adopt the standard convention that the actors in world affairs are states, primarily the great powers, and we consider their decisions and the relations among them. That is not wrong. But we would do well to keep in mind that this level of abstraction can also be highly misleading.

Wed
27
Apr

A New Vision or a New Reformism?

From Anarkismo by Wayne Price

workers' democracy from the perspective of revolutionary eco-anarchism

There is a new approach on the U.S. Left, which rejects both capitalism and state socialism. In several ways it resembles anarchism. It has been promoted by The Next System Project, and has been critiqued recently by Sam Gindin--who makes some insightful comments, but also demonstrates limitations.

Wed
27
Apr

Anarcho-Primitivism Is Not Just Another Ideology: An Interview with John Zerzan

“Are people happy with domestication, with leading domesticated lives? I think the answer is, resoundingly, 'no'.” - John Zerzan

From the site 'More Thought': http://moretht.blogspot.com (see this site for a PDF of the interview and a Czech translation of the interview)

This interview took place in December 2015, during the Ekofilm festival in the city of Brno, the Czech Republic, and was transcribed and edited April 2016.

Q: What do you think is the importance of environmental festivals like Ekofilm, especially when visitors to such festival are mostly already environmentally conscious?

Wed
20
Apr

Occupy: Democracy versus Autonomy

b. traven
CrimethInc
April 14, 2016

The story goes that the very first gathering of Occupy Wall Street began as an old-fashioned top-down rally with speakers droning on—until a Greek student (and perhaps—an anarchist?) interrupted it and demanded that they hold a proper horizontal assembly instead. She and some of the youngsters in attendance sat down in a circle on the other side of the plaza and began holding a meeting using consensus process. One by one, people trickled over from the audience that had been listening to speakers and joined the circle. It was August 2, 2011.

Sat
16
Apr

Dismantling neoliberal education: a lesson from the Zapatistas

by Levi Gahman
ROAR magazine

The story of the Zapatistas is one of dignity, outrage, and grit. It is an enduring saga of over 500 years of resistance to the attempted conquest of the land and lives of indigenous peasants. It is nothing less than a revolutionary and poetic account of hope, insurgency and liberation—a movement characterized as much by adversity and anguish, as it is by laughter and dancing.

More precisely, the ongoing chronicles of the Zapatista insurrection provide a dramatic account of how indigenous people have defied the imposition of state violence, oppressive gender roles and capitalist plunder. And for people of the Ch’ol, Tseltal, Tsotsil, Tojolabal, Mam and Zoque communities in Chiapas, Mexico who make the decision to become Zapatista, it is a story reborn, revitalized and re-learned each new day, with each new step.

Sat
09
Apr

Ursula K. Le Guin on Racism, Anarchy, and Hearing Her Characters Speak

This interview originally appeared in Issue 14 of Structo Magazine. http://structomagazine.co.uk/structo/issue-14/

It’s not hard to see why Ursula K. Le Guin is best known for her early novels.

In the space of six years came A Wizard of Earthsea (1968), The Left Hand of Darkness (1969), The Lathe of Heaven (1971) and The Dispossessed (1974). These books and many others—including Lavinia (2008), an astonishing take on Virgil’s Aeneid—have been a steady influence on authors of the imagination, notably Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, David Mitchell, Salman Rushdie and Zadie Smith, who said that “Le Guin writes as well as any non-‘genre’ writer alive.”

We talked at Le Guin’s home in Portland, Oregon.

Euan Monaghan: Lavinia was your most recent novel. It’s an interesting book to come at this point in your career. I’m interested to know how it came about.

Fri
08
Apr

Destination Anarchy! Every Step Is an Obstacle

By Tasos Sagris of VOID NETWORK, this text is part of a series exploring the anarchist analysis of democracy.

CrimethInc

I find myself in the courtyard of the School of Fine Arts in Athens, Greece. It’s May 25, 2011, a hot summer day. A five-day anarchist and anti-authoritarian festival starts in six hours and I am scrambling to prepare all the small details I have in mind. I’m working alone.

Thu
07
Apr

To Spread the Revolution: Anarchist Archives and Libraries

by Jessica Moran

From Kate Sharpely Library

For anarchists—those defined in the most general terms as believing in a political and social theory of society without government and through voluntary relationships—the written and published word has been central to their movement. From early on, anarchists in the United States and Europe published and collected their ideas and written work. This published literature was one of the main sources of anarchist propaganda and a means to communicate and spread ideas. Newspapers, pamphlets, and, books were instrumental in sharing and documenting the philosophies and actions of the anarchist movement; anarchist libraries were a natural continuation and followed shortly thereafter.

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