Opinion

Sun
21
Feb

MPs Are Scared. So They Should Be!

Freedom (U.K.)

Tue
16
Feb

The Nine Filters That Explain Why Fundamental Change Cannot Come From Voting

With General Election 2016 upon us, why can't the 99% simply vote in a government that acts in our interests and not that of the 1%? At a simple level parliamentary elections sound like the ideal way for the mass of the ‘have nots’ to use their numbers to overcome the power and influences of the tiny number of have’s. Occupy talked about this division in the language of the 1% and 99%; a crude approximation that does reflect a reality where the number of wealthy decision makers is actually very tiny, indeed less than 1%

Sat
06
Feb

Smash Clintonism: Why Democrats, Not Republicans, are the Problem

by Andrew Levine
CounterPunch
February 5, 2016

Nine times out of ten, or ninety-nine times out of a hundred, electoral politics at the national level these days does more to disable democracy than to enhance it.

Sometimes, though, elections can be good for something. This may be one of those times.

Until recently, it seemed that the 2016 Presidential election, a factor in American politics since at least 2014, would, as usual, deflect democratic impulses into useless electoral pursuits – and, as if that weren’t bad enough, that it would do so in a boring, unedifying way: by pitting two pro-corporate, interventionist-minded, military-industrial complex friendly political families, the Clintons and the Bushes, against one another.

It seemed that the only redeeming feature of the impending spectacle would be that one or the other of those god-awful families would finally be done in.

Mon
01
Feb

Global inequality is escalating rapidly - let’s end concentrations of wealth and power, completely

AndrewNFlood
Infoshop News (via Anarchist Writers)
February 1, 2016

Oxfam has just released a report that shows global inequality has escalated rapidly over the last 6 years.  The particular measure they used is a very important one.  First they calculated the wealth held by the poorest 50% of the planets population, which is about 3.6 billion people. And then they asked how many of the richest people held the same amount of wealth.

Mon
01
Feb

Myths About Anarchism

This is a write-up of my talk at the 2015 London Anarchist Bookfair. It is based on my notes and so will not be exactly the same as at the event but it will be close enough. The meeting summary initially submitted for the programme was:

Anarchists and anarchism have had a lot of nonsense written about them over the years. Whether it is proclaiming that we want chaos or see revolution as an easy process, the “conventional wisdom” is often at odds with reality. This applies to individual anarchists, with Proudhon painted as an advocate of “labour notes” or Kropotkin a gentle Prince of non-violence who had an idealistic vision of social revolution. This is not true. Anarchism and anarchists have a coherent and practical vision of both social change and a better (not perfect) society. Join Iain McKay (author of An Anarchist FAQ) as be explodes some of the common myths about anarchism and anarchists.

Thu
21
Jan

Noam Chomsky tells Al Jazeera “I’m not an absolute pacifist”

In an interview with Al Jazeera English’s flagship current affairs show, ‘UpFront’, MIT professor emeritus Noam Chomsky a long-standing critic of US foreign policy and overseas interventions, said he supported U.S. air strikes against ISIL.

“I’m not an absolute pacifist,” he said. “I think there are times when the use of military force defensively is legitimate.“

"Defending the Kurds against the ISIL attacks, yes, that’s legitimate,” he added, explaining that the "Kurdish areas of Syria” constitute a “fairly decent society” which “certainly merit support” from the US air force.

Chomsky condemned the Turkish President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan who in a public address criticised “so-called intellectuals” like Chomsky for supporting Kurdish separatists and invited the MIT professor to visit Turkey.

Wed
20
Jan

Noam Chomsky Interview: "Enormous Sense of Hopelessness and Anger" Reflected in Appeal of Trump And Sanders

Written by Melissa Parker
Smashing Interviews

Melissa Parker (Smashing Interviews Magazine): We last spoke about a year ago, and there have been a few presidential debates since then.

Noam Chomsky: I never watch them (laughs). I read the transcripts later.

Melissa Parker (Smashing Interviews Magazine): Well, tell me who the final two candidates will be when the dust settles.

Noam Chomsky: I assume that Hillary Clinton will win the Democratic nomination just because of the nature of our electoral system, which is basically now “bought” elections overwhelmingly, and the major funders will probably succeed at putting her across. What Bernie Sanders has achieved is pretty remarkable, but I doubt very much, in our existing system, he can make it beyond the primaries. So I think a fair guess is that Clinton will be nominated.

Tue
12
Jan

Eco-Socialism and Decentralism

by Wayne Price
January 11, 2016

Theorists of the climate-justice movement have been raising decentralist ideas as part of their programs for an ecologically-balanced society. This ecological program means more local democracy, workers’ management of industry, consumer coops, and federations of radically-democratic institutions. Such ideas revive the decentralist ideas of anarchism.

From conservatives and liberals to Marxists, there is faith in big machines, big industries, big corporations, big cities, big countries, big buildings, and big government—a belief in the necessity of centralized, bureaucratic, top-down, socially-alienated, institutions. This is not to say that most people like giant cities, big business, or big government; but they do not see any alternative.

Sat
09
Jan

Bookchin & Öcalan: Fruits On The Tree Of Mankind

9th January 2015
by Jihad Hammy and Eleanor Finley
Kurdish Question

“There seems to be a strong tendency to collect ideas rather than derive them, to disassemble and reassemble them as though we were dealing with an automobile engine, rather than explore them as aspects of a process.” – Murray Bookchin, 1986. The Modern Crisis.

“We must neither be enveloped in European civilization nor must we reject it categorically. We have to contribute to the development of humanity as a whole.” - Abdullah Öcalan.

Rojava is a small geographical area in the Middle East that is inspiring and giving hope to people all over the world. Although this revolution has been surprising to many, it is not at all strange that Rojava has captured so much attention, for the paradigm which fuels it retains the development of free and democratic ideas throughout history. This is the reason why so many people feel akin to this revolution and are a part of it.

Sun
13
Dec

Why the first female first minister of North of Ireland will not advance feminism

by Fionnghuala Nic Rioberaid - WSM

It is not coming as much of a surprise that some middle-class, career-focused feminists have made claims of this being some sort of an advance of feminism. Many are claiming that this represents a great change in northern Irish society, as a move away from the male dominated arena that we understands politics here to be (the same could be said throughout the World of course).

Those hailing Foster’s promotion as a feminist advancement will generally take the approach that having more women in politics is always a positive thing – regardless of their politics. Those who hold these opinions are usually those who can afford to hold them, or who are so privileged in every other avenue of their life that they don’t need to consider anything but the gender of those who implement policies.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Opinion