Opinion

Fri
15
Jul

Kropotkin (and Malatesta and Lenin) on war

By Anarcho
Anarchist Writers
July 12, 2016

Well, the UK has – narrowly – voted to leave the EU. It was, in many ways, two-fingers to a system (neo-liberalism) which has failed so many across the UK – yet this failure was home-grown, in Thatcherism rather than the EU. Even areas which received large investment from the EU (such as parts of Wales and Cornwall) voted to leave – if the Westminster elite actually cared about these areas then the EU would not have needed to invest money there. So we can fully expect – once the Tory leadership campaign and its populist rhetoric has ended – that the money that will not be given to the EU will be spent by the Tories to cut taxes for the top 5%...

Thu
14
Jul

Electoral politics is not a gateway drug

By Scott Jay
Libcom.org
July 13, 2016

Rather than leading to more militant and radical forms of resistance, electoral politics typically leads only to more electoral politics.

In what should be a surprise to no one, Bernie Sanders has officially endorsed Hillary Clinton for President.

For months, various left-wing groups and periodicals proclaimed that the Sanders campaign could lead to a break with the Democrats or could lay the basis for a future struggles and organizations independent of the Democratic Party. We can now assess whether or not the situation has ripened these possibilities.

Sat
02
Jul

Noam Chomsky on Globalization, Inequality and Political Alienation

By James Resnick, E-International Relations
Saturday, 2 July 2016

Noam Chomsky is Emeritus Professor of Linguistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Seen by many as "the father of modern linguistics", his work as a theoretical linguist from the 1950s revolutionized the field of linguistics by treating language as a uniquely human, biologically based cognitive capacity. Through his contributions to linguistics and related fields, including cognitive psychology and the philosophies of mind and language, Chomsky helped to initiate and sustain what came to be known as the "cognitive revolution." Chomsky has also gained a worldwide following as a political dissident for his analyses of the pernicious influence of economic elites on U.S. domestic politics, foreign policy, and intellectual culture.

Tue
28
Jun

Democracy: The Patriotic Temptation

by CrimethInc

In this installment in our series exploring the anarchist critique of democracy, guest author Uri Gordon discusses the attractions and risks of democratic discourse.

Mon
27
Jun

The Democracy of the Reaction, 1848-2011

by b. traven
Jun 23rd, 2016
CrimethInc

What harm could possibly come of using the discourse of democracy to describe the object of our movements for liberation? We can answer this question with a fable drawn from history: the story of the uprising that took place in Paris in June 1848.

In addition, to commemorate the June 1848 uprising, 168 years ago this week, we’ve prepared a biography of one of its many colorful participants, including the first translation into English of the only surviving account from the proletarian side of the barricades.

Thu
02
Jun

What Emma Goldman Has in Common — With Bernie Sanders

Benjamin Ivry
Forward
June 1, 2016

Emma Goldman (1869–1940), the Lithuanian Jewish anarchist, was widely known in America as Red Emma for her defense of free speech, labor protests, women’s rights and birth control. Although she was deported from the United States in 1919, starting in the 1970s increasing numbers of historians and readers have been drawn to Goldman’s personality and advocacy. Recently, the Forward’s Benjamin Ivry spoke with Donna M. Kowal, author of “Tongue of Fire: Emma Goldman, Public Womanhood, and the Sex Question” (State University of New York Press) and associate professor at SUNY’s the College at Brockport, about the abiding allure of Red Emma.

Fri
20
May

A Socialist On City Council: A Look At The Career Of Kshama Sawant

By Michael Reagan
Black Rose Federation

The case of Kshama Sawant shows that no matter how good the candidate, business as usual rules in elected office.

This article is part of an ongoing series called “Socialist faces in high places” looking at the left in relation to the electoral path and state power.

2016 is shaping up to be a year of social movements: Black Lives Matter, trans-equity, teachers and workers struggles. It is also an election year, and one candidate, Bernie Sanders, has activists and organizers across the country “feeling the bern.” But is the enthusiasm justified, will electing good politicians lead to substantial change?

Sun
15
May

Anarchist Organisation – Practice as Theory Actualised

by Anarcho
Anarchist Writers
5/05/2016

“organisation, that is to say, association for a specific purpose and with the structure and means required to attain it, is a necessary aspect of social life. A man in isolation cannot even live the life of a beast... Having therefore to join with other humans... he must submit to the will of others (be enslaved) or subject others to his will (be in authority) or live with others in fraternal agreement in the interests of the greatest good of all (be an associate). Nobody can escape from this necessity.” – Errico Malatesta[1]

Sun
15
May

Revolution Is More Than a Word: 23 Theses on Anarchism

Gabriel Kuhn
PM Press

This text originally appeared on Alpine Anarchist Productions, a project I've been involved with for the past 15 years.

Intro

Since the turn of the millennium, anarchism has experienced a strong upswing. In a widely read 2004 article by David Graeber and Andrej Grubačić, it was announced as the “revolutionary movement of the twenty-first century”, and in a recent book on the Occupy Wall Street movement, titled Translating Anarchy and based on interviews with numerous organizers, author Mark Bray contests that anarchist ideas were the driving ideological force behind it. Meanwhile, anarchist projects (journals, bookfairs, organizing groups) have increased significantly over the past twenty years. This is all great news.

Tue
03
May

Seattle May Day 2016 Analysis

by Sophia Burns

Seattle May Day started with an open-air punk show outside the tourist-trap mall downtown. I found a couple of comrades from RATPAC (Revolutionary Alliance of Trans People Against Capitalism) reading zines behind a Rojava solidarity group’s table. Progressively larger clusters of protesters started to appear. While I made a sign and chatted with my protest buddy about last year, we saw cops gather both on bikes and on horseback, glaring at the growing Black Bloc. Nearly every slogan I saw was explicitly anarchist, as were almost all of the organized groups; in fact, the entire time, only one person attempted to push a socialist newspaper on me. A few of the self-declared “real life superhero” vigilantes associated with Phoenix Jones hung around in spandex and body armor, carrying heavy sticks and stun guns. They’ve shown up for May Day rallies before, roughing up protesters alongside the police.

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