Opinion

Sun
13
Nov

No One is Coming to Save Us

An Anarchist Response to the Election of Donald Trump

First of May Anarchist Alliance
November 2016

The surprise victory of Donald Trump this past Tuesday has quickly presented people in this country (and around the world) with a vastly different political landscape than we had expected. We are seeing a rise in right-wing attacks as the far right is emboldened by the victory, much like what happened earlier this year after the success of the Brexit referendum in the UK. The incompetence and capitulation of the Democratic Party has forced many of its former supporters to recognize that the fight against the far right cannot be won by liberal electoral politics. This new reality forces anti-authoritarians of all stripes to rise to the challenge of building strong movements for working class self-defense in this new atmosphere.

Sat
12
Nov

President Trump: Countdown to Apocalypse

by b. traven
CrimethInc Ex-Workers Collective
Nov 9th, 2016

Move the doomsday clock forward another click.

We were right about the direction things are heading, but wrong about the timeframe. We thought Clinton would win the election, and would then be discredited by new scandals and the challenges of preserving an increasingly unpopular status quo, producing a reactionary surge like the one that recently toppled Dilma in Brazil. Instead, the scandal broke before the election, with the announcement of further FBI inquiries into emails associated with Clinton. And, as with the Brexit vote, everyone underestimated just how desperate and reactionary the general public has become—at least the ones who still identify with the ruling order enough to vote at all. It’s later than you think.

Tue
25
Oct

After the Election, the Reaction

by Crimethinc

Trump le Monde

The final Presidential debate of 2016 was a gala event in Las Vegas pitting a reality TV star against the latest representative of a political dynasty. It was set up as a symbolic clash between business and politics, with the roles cast so convincingly that it was really possible to imagine the two categories to be at odds. The antagonism of the candidates was still more believable because everyone shares it: these are the most unpopular Presidential candidates in history, at a time when both business and politics have lost their credibility. But these are our choices—right?

Tue
18
Oct

Propaganda By Deed And The Glory Of Self-Sacrifice: The Case of Peter Kropotkin

By Milan Djurasovic
www.countercurrents.org
October 17th, 2016

George Woodcock, a prominent Canadian writer and anarchist thinker, writes that anarchism’s “ultimate aim is always social change; its present attitude is always one of social condemnation, even though it may proceed from an individualist view of man’s nature; its method is always that of social revolution, violent or otherwise.”[1]

Tue
18
Oct

Anarchism and Nationalism: On the Subsidiarity of Deconstruction

Uri Gordon
Special to Infoshop News
October 18, 2016

Forthcoming in The Brill Companion to Anarchism and Philosophy, ed. N. Jun. Leiden: Brill (2017)

Mon
10
Oct

Is Trumpism Fascism?

by Wayne Price
Anarkismo.net
October 7, 2016

Whether Donald J. Trump wins or (more likely) loses the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the movement which he has stirred up will continue in one form or another. A question which is widely asked is, whether this movement—call it Trumpism—is fascist, semi-fascist, or a forerunner of fascism?

Mon
10
Oct

What’s an Anarchy? A Response to ‘Delusion’ Among Anarchists

by Derek Scarlino
Love and Rage (a Utica, NY Media Collective)

David Graeber, professor of anthropology at the London School of Economics, introduces himself on Twitter as such: I’m an anthropologist, sometimes I occupy things & such. I see anarchism as something you do not an identity so don’t call me the anarchist anthropologist.

The author of Debt: The First 5000 Years and On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs has also seen himself attached to things like coining the term “We are the 99%”. He’s also really nailed the concept of anarchism on the head as it requires deliberate and direct action in order to produce an active state of anarchy.

Sun
02
Oct

What Makes Call-Out Culture So Toxic

by Asam Ahmad
Briarpatch Magazine
March 2, 2015

Call-out culture refers to the tendency among progressives, radicals, activists, and community organizers to publicly name instances or patterns of oppressive behaviour and language use by others. People can be called out for statements and actions that are sexist, racist, ableist, and the list goes on. Because call-outs tend to be public, they can enable a particularly armchair and academic brand of activism: one in which the act of calling out is seen as an end in itself.

Thu
08
Sep

The 9/11 Conspiracists: Vindicated After All These Years?

We’re homing in on the tenth anniversary of the destruction  of the Wall Street Trade Towers  and the attack on the Pentagon.  One in seven Americans and one in four among  those aged 16-24, (so a recent poll commissioned by the BBC tells us)  believe that there was a vast conspiracy in which the U.S. government was involved.  But across those ten years have the charges that it was an “inside job” –– a favored phrase of the self-styled “truthers”  — received any serious buttress?

The answer is no.

Thu
08
Sep

Anarchy, Swamp, and Utopia

by Jesse Walker
Sep. 8, 2016
Hit & Run Blog

In Seeing Like a State and The Art of Not Being Governed, the anthropologist and political scientist James C. Scott explores the idea of nonstate spaces. In such regions, he writes in Art, "owing largely to geographical obstacles, the state has particular difficulty in establishing and maintaining its authority." Those obstacles can take many shapes—Scott mentions "swamps, marshes, mangrove coasts, deserts, volcanic margins, and even the open sea"—but the result is the same: They become havens "for peoples resisting or fleeing the state."

It sounds exotic, and the territory that Art ends up discussing in detail—a vast Asian area known as Zomia—is far from America. But such spaces have appeared here in the United States too. The Great Dismal Swamp in North Carolina and Virgina is, as its name suggests, an unforgiving landscape. But it was also a refuge for slaves and for others fleeing authority.

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