Labor

Thu
23
Feb

Tens of Thousands Strike on Day without Immigrants

February 23, 2017
Dan DiMaggio, Sonia Singh
Labor Notes

Arkansas poultry workers, Brooklyn warehouse workers and house cleaners, Twin Cities roofers, and thousands of students in places like Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Charlotte, North Carolina. They were all among the tens of thousands who stayed home from work or school across the country during Thursday, February 16’s “Day without Immigrants.”

The action, largely spread over social media and informal networks in working-class immigrant communities, was a response to President Donald Trump’s promise to dramatically expand immigration enforcement and the wave of raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement the prior week.

“They’re calling us criminals and rapists,” said Jose Flemate, a member of Roofers Local 96 in St. Paul, Minnesota, who struck with his co-workers. “We’re not like that—we came to America looking for a better life, and we worked hard and built America.

Tue
07
Feb

How Worker Co-Ops Are Creating Economic Stability In Uncertain Times

Sun
18
Dec

The Power of Deep Organizing

by Sam Gindin
Jacobin magazine
December 8, 2016

The profound defeat of the US labor movement over the past three to four decades is usually measured by the loss of things that workers once took for granted like decent wages and benefits. A less quantifiable but ultimately more decisive indicator is the retreat from possibilities. By extension, the labor movement’s renewal (or reinvention) is inseparable from reversing, through effective struggle, this lowering of expectations. Jane McAlevey captured this sentiment in the title of her first book, Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell), a memoir based on her experiences as a labor organizer.

Thu
15
Dec

Trump Can’t Kill Labor Struggle

Kevin Carson | @KevinCarson1
December 9th, 2016
Center for a Stateless Society

As you might have predicted, the incoming Trump regime is hostile to labor unions. In fact Raymond Hogler, professor of management at Colorado State University, predicts that Trump’s policies — including packing the National Labor Relations Board, appointing anti-union Supreme Court justices, and encouraging right-to-work laws — will be a “fatal blow” to organized labor (“Why America’s labor unions are about to die,” The Conversation, Nov. 29).

Sun
11
Dec

Building Working-Class Defense Organizations: An Interview with the Twin Cities GDC

First of May Anarchist Alliance

The General Defense Committee of the Industrial Workers World (IWW) has become an important pole of struggle for pro-working-class revolutionaries in the Twin Cities. While active on a number of different fronts it is the participation of the General Defense Committee (GDC) in the year-long struggle against police killings and brutality in the Twin Cities that has largely led to the significant growth of the organization. The GDC has grown to approximately 90 dues-paying members in Minnesota, and has several active working-groups. In the wake of Trump's election victory, Wobblies and others across the country have begun establishing their own GDC locals - strongly influenced by the Twin Cities' model.

Interview:

Sun
13
Nov

Labor Leaders Deserve Their Share of the Blame for Donald Trump’s Victory

By Micah Uetricht
In These Times
Noember 10, 2016

Donald Trump is going to be the next president of the United States. I feel a wild urge to scrub my hands with steel wool and bleach after typing those words—my fingers feel filthy.

If we want to avoid a similar nightmare in the future, we have to parse this election’s lessons and figure out who is to blame—not for cheap point-scoring, but to make sure we don’t make the same mistakes again. That means we have to talk about how American union leaders helped hand this race to Trump.

It wasn't on purpose, of course. It’s no secret that a Trump presidency will be absolutely disastrous for labor. A national right-to-work law, Wisconsin's viciously anti-union Gov. Scott Walker as Secretary of Labor, a pro-corporate National Labor Relations Board—all could be in the cards under Trump.

Mon
31
Oct

England: Battle of Orgreave inquiry ruled out

BBC
October 31, 2016

Thousands of miners and police clashed at the Yorkshire coking site in 1984.

Campaigners said officers led by South Yorkshire Police were heavy-handed and manufactured statements.

However, Mrs Rudd said she did not believe there was "sufficient basis... to instigate either a statutory inquiry or an independent review".

Shadow home secretary Diane Abbott described the decision as a "grave injustice", while Andy Burnham MP called it an "establishment stitch-up".

Barbara Jackson, secretary of the Orgreave Truth and Justice Campaign, said the announcement had come as a "complete shock and a great disappointment".

Meanwhile Louise Haigh MP accused Mrs Rudd of misleading campaigners over a possible inquiry.

Mon
12
Sep

20 Ways to Help Your Employees Struggling with Food Insecurity and Hunger

by Infoshop News
September 2, 2016

20. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

19. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

18. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

17. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

16. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

15. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

14. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

13. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

12. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

11. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

10. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

9. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

8. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

7. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

6. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

5. PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

4.  PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

3.  PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

2.  PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

1.  PAY YOUR WORKERS MORE!

 

Update: Everyday Feminism has published an apology for their offensive article: You Were Right – We Were Wrong

Sat
30
Jul

Working-Class Militancy in the Global South

by Immanuel Ness/ROAR Magazine

A profound movement is emerging among workers in developing countries, demanding radical action on grievances outside the system of established unions.

In the 1980s, the economies that had dominated the world in the postwar era entered a period of far-reaching transition away from state participation to private sector dominance. The conversion process was not uniform: in some cases the shift to market control occurred gradually through the withdrawal of state subsidies for social welfare, and in other instances a radical shift away from public welfare was imposed all at once, in what came to be known as shock therapy.

Fri
15
Jan

 This Is What $15 an Hour Looks Like



On a crisp November morning in Oakland, 50 people dressed in red T-shirts burst into a McDonald’s, bringing breakfast orders to a halt. From behind the counter, several cashiers gaped at the scene, where an orderly line of customers had been replaced by a rowdy crew that bounced and shouted, calling for the restaurant to raise its wages to $15 an hour. A supervisor whipped out her cell phone and began filming. The chant, directed at the workers, grew louder: “Come on out—we’ve got your back!” After giving it some thought, three female employees walked past their supervisor, clocked out, and joined the protesters. The crowd erupted in cheers.

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