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Tuesday, September 02 2014 @ 09:08 PM CDT

What Gianfranco Sanguinetti was going through

Terrorism

In a newly translated and published letter, written around the time that he was completing "On Terrorism and the State" (1978), Gianfranco Sanguinetti reveals the attacks he was exposed to at the time. In this document, he speaks of,

What Gianfranco Sanguinetti was going through

In a newly translated and published letter, written around the time that he was completing "On Terrorism and the State" (1978), Gianfranco Sanguinetti reveals the attacks he was exposed to at the time. In this document, he speaks of,

"the risks that I was running, not only where the police were concerned, but also with respect to the Stalinists: the unknown people who were wandering around my house and who had cut the chain that blocked entrance to my private road; the fire that had been set at my house the previous Sunday; other provocateurs who had cut down the two oak trees in my fields and who had threatened me with another fire; the fact that I perhaps needed to distance myself from the place; the very suspect mail carrier who was a stoolpigeon for the cops (he lived next door to my property); the letters from Guy that arrived open; the new vineyards that I was preparing; how the publication of "Remedy to Everything" would be accompanied by a scandal perpetrated by the wildcat workers and friends at the Motta and Alemagna factories in Milan, plus a postscript in which I announced the occurrence of another fire (previously threatened) set on my property just before I sent off the letter, on 27 September."

To read the entire document, and see the picture Gianfranco took of the fire, visit this page:

http://www.notbored.org/sanguinetti-24September1978.html

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What Gianfranco Sanguinetti was going through | 1 comments | Create New Account
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What Gianfranco Sanguinetti was going through
Authored by: Bill Not Bored on Tuesday, May 14 2013 @ 08:21 PM CDT

Why does this matter? It matters because, in 1981-1982, Guy Debord – motivated as much by monomania as by jealousy – campaigned to have Sanguinetti excluded from the international revolutionary scene and to have the importance of Sanguinetti’s book on terrorism (“On Terrorism and the State”) minimized. Evidence of the effectiveness of this campaign can be seen in the prefaces that were published along with the Dutch and English translations of Sanguinetti’s book. In both cases, these prefaces raise questions and suspicions about the author’s truthfulness and commitment to the cause. As a result, the very book that followed these prefaces was not taken as seriously as it should have been. (It is certainly the case that, even today, few people know how active and effective Sanguinetti was in the years after the Situationist International disbanded in 1972.)

What was the basis of these questions and suspicions? Guy Debord’s rather vague but ominous insinuations about Sanguinetti and his friend Aliberto Mignoli. What was insinuated? That, in 1978, Sanguinetti missed a golden opportunity to expose the truth about the Aldo Moro affair, namely, that Moro was not abducted and murdered by the Red Brigades (still a commonly accepted notion), but by elements within the Italian government and bourgeoisie that wanted to ruin the “historic compromise” that would have brought the Italian Communist Party into the ruling coalition. But Sanguinetti did not “miss” the opportunity: he denounced the falsity of the accounts of the Moro Affair in “On Terrorism and the State.” But, for Debord and his henchmen (especially Jean-Francois Martos), this wasn’t good enough.

In the documents that Sanguinetti is beginning to make available – his motto had been that one doesn’t respond to calumny and that was exactly what Debord and Martos were offering: calumny) – he shows what he was going through at the time. The significance is double: unlike the French pro-situs, who masturbated in front of their mental images of revolutionary struggle, Sanguinetti was at the front lines of real struggle; and unlike his self-righteous critics and would be censors, Sanguinetti published “On Terrorism and the State,” despite the dangers he was facing.