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Wednesday, November 26 2014 @ 10:06 AM CST

For Life and Land: A Conversation With Good Mind Seeds

Farm Report

Good Mind Seeds is based in what is now known as western Pennsylvania. Guided by his traditional Native culture and upbringing, Phil Seneca is attempting to protect and revive what is left of the precious crop diversity that once existed here in the northeast in the days before industrial agriculture and genetically modified crops. In addition to talking about Good Mind Seeds and the benefits of organic agriculture, we also spoke at length about many interesting things including how the traditional Native world view results in a specific kind of relationship to the land.

For Life and Land: A Conversation With Good Mind Seeds

Good Mind Seeds is based in what is now known as western Pennsylvania. Guided by his traditional Native culture and upbringing, Phil Seneca is attempting to protect and revive what is left of the precious crop diversity that once existed here in the northeast in the days before industrial agriculture and genetically modified crops. In addition to talking about Good Mind Seeds and the benefits of organic agriculture, we also spoke at length about many interesting things including how the traditional Native world view results in a specific kind of relationship to the land.

Excerpt from the audio (Click here to listen to the interview):

"Nya'weh Skano, my name is Phil Seneca and I'm Onondaga Haudenosaunee; Americans say Seneca-Iroquois. Onondaga Haudenosaunee means 'The People of the Great Hill Building the Long House'. I started Good Mind Seeds five years ago because most of the northeastern native varieties of corn, beans and squash were exterminated during the first 400 years of colonization. Now I'm trying to accumulate what's still around and develop new varieties that are adapted to this climate and soil..."
 

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For Life and Land: A Conversation With Good Mind Seeds | 1 comments | Create New Account
The following comments are owned by whomever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
For Life and Land: A Conversation With Good Mind Seeds
Authored by: PhilSeneca on Monday, November 12 2012 @ 07:43 AM CST

 Nya:weh skano.

Thank you for posting this podcast of my interview. I am happy to see that it is being circulated.

I have noticed some profound innacuracies in the description and quotation that i need to ammend in order to be right. those are:

in the description of the interview, i am described as a traditional. although i would have prefered to be raised in a traditional way, attending ceremonies, i was raised off reservation by my christian mother. turns out we dont always get what we want. if you were to chage the comment describing the interview as follows, i would greatly appreciate it. (ronny changed the deep green philly post to this for me)

"Good Mind Seeds is based in what is now known as western Pennsylvania. Guided by his history and native culture, Phil Seneca is attempting to protect and revive what is left of the precious crop diversity that once existed here in the northeast in the days before colonization, industrial agriculture and genetically modified crops. In addition to talking about Good Mind Seeds and the benefits of organic agriculture, we also spoke at length about many interesting things including how a native world view can result in a specific relationship to the land."

Also, I am quoted saying that i am onondaga. This is simply not true. I am ONANDOWAGA, which is the real name for  what americans call "SENECA." Onondaga nation is Onondaga nation. that is their real name and although it is similar "ONANDOWAGA," the names refer to different nations of people. 

I would greatly appreciate it if the information here could be made accurate, as i hate being misrepresented.

thanks again.

-Phil Seneca