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Fast and Furious Is One Among Many Similar Drug-War Warts

Ending the Drug War

Ever since ATF’s Fast and Furious gun-running operation was catapulted into the national spotlight in early 2011, the focus has been on the politics influencing the police work and the manipulations behind intelligence operations, with little to no attention paid to the dysfunction of the drug-war bureaucracy.

Fast and Furious Is One Among Many Similar Drug-War Warts

by Bill Conroy
Narconews
January 16, 2012

Turf Wars, Agency Budgets and Case Stats Trump Lives in the Era of Prohibition

Ever since ATF’s Fast and Furious gun-running operation was catapulted into the national spotlight in early 2011, the focus has been on the politics influencing the police work and the manipulations behind intelligence operations, with little to no attention paid to the dysfunction of the drug-war bureaucracy.

A report released by the US Government Accountability Office in June 2009, some three months before Operation Fast and Furious was even launched, underscores that dysfunction in succinct detail. Advance copies of that report were provided at the time to “the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, and State and to the Office of National Drug Control Policy,” GAO documents state.

In that now two-and-a-half-year-old report is a blistering indictment of operations, obviously already in existence prior to June 2009 and Fast and Furious, that utilized a strategy similar to that employed in Fast and Furious — which allowed criminals to “walk” thousands of guns into Mexico under the watch of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (better known as ATF). The supposed goal: identify and bring to justice the higher-ups in Mexico’s arms trafficking organizations.

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Fast and Furious Is One Among Many Similar Drug-War Warts | 1 comments | Create New Account
The following comments are owned by whomever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
Radical change in ultimate intent
Authored by: NoMoreCorruption on Wednesday, January 18 2012 @ 07:45 AM CST

Bill: I don't buy that this kind of dysfunction is any excuse, if you mean this to be an excuse for Fast and Furious leading to the deaths of U.S. law enforcement agents and untold numbers of innocent Mexican nationals. There will always be some corruption in any large law enforcement agency. The occasional rogue agent can disrupt legitimate law enforcement just enough to keep the bad guys in business. A couple of rogue agents can exploit inter-agency agreements to that same end leading to bottom-up spread of corruption, as a few others join in. Low level corruption will exist no matter who is president, and it is generally self-correcting. But top-down control by a corrupt higher administration is more dangerous because higher levels can manipulate the extent to which inter-agency agreements can provide cover, confuse matters, and hide misdeeds. If some inter-agency dysfunction existed, then it would appear that the Obama administration exploited and expanded it. What is telling is that soon after the Obama administration took office, programs that used to be sting operations morphed into "fake sting operations" that flat out facilitated crime and profits for the cartels. A radical change in ultimate intent seems to have occurred right after Obama took office, in March 2009 according to public records. But the change was hidden in the many hierarchical layers of multiple agencies. This change in ultimate intent is consistent with the larger policy making of the current administration. Obama has been disinterested in working with Congress to create jobs for U.S. citizens. Instead, Obama supports increased welfare, unchecked illegal immigration, reduced border control, and Mexican trucking deep into the U.S., while at the same time increasing bans on shops from selling medical marijuana legal in some states. These political actions, as a collective, increase profits for the cartels. Illegal drugs are simply too expensive for most people to waste hard-earned money on, and most working people are law-abiding. But a huge welfare class will spend "easy money" on drugs, as will rich people on Wall Street and wealthy celebrities. Strengthening the welfare state increases cartel profits and at the same time provides food stamps, health care, and other benefits for the 1 million or more who distribute and sell drugs in the U.S. Nice benefits for those who are damaging the fabric of our country. We need to face it: the cartels and their associates have taken over a huge slice of our economy and this reportedly has been sanctioned by agreements with "the highest levels of government”. U.S. Americans should be outraged. The entire legitimate economy has been harmed, making Fast and Furious an economic issue in addition to a law enforcement issue. Occam’s razor teaches us that the simplest hypothesis is usually correct. You only need to follow the money to find the most parsimonious hypothesis. The winners in the drug war are the cartels, and Forbes Magazine has verified their vast wealth. Why is Obama so secure about having enough cash? Obama swept the nation in 2008, in part, because he raised so much cash. It validated him as a candidate. Who put Obama in office ? Obama still seems to be able to get his hands on cash easily, even when the legitimate economy is tanked. It's worth considering why Obama seems to have allowed or ordered a Fast and Furious type endeavor so early in his presidential term.

Edited on Wednesday, January 18 2012 @ 07:52 AM CST by NoMoreCorruption